8 Rules to Do Everything Better

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I came across this article via Firefox Pocket app by author and writer Brad Stulberg which describes his list of 8 principles that according to him establish “foundation for a better you”.

Principles are fundamental truths that serve as the foundations for behavior that gets you what you want out of life.

– Ray Dalio, Investor and Author of Principles (source: Pocket)

8 Rules to Do Everything Better

  1. Stress + Rest = Growth. “Whether you want to grow your body or mind or get better at a specific skill, you need to push to the outer limits of your current ability, and then follow that hard work with appropriate recovery and reflection.
  2. Focus on the Process, Not Results: “The best athletes and entrepreneurs aren’t focused on being the best; they’re focused on constant self-improvement. .. Research shows that concentrating on the process is best for both performance and mental health.
  3. Stay Humble: “Humility is the key to growth. If you don’t maintain an open mind, you’ll severely limit your opportunities to learn and make progress. .. Knowledge is always evolving and advancing — if you want to evolve and advance with it, you need to keep an open mind.
  4. Build Your Tribe: “There’s an old saying that you’re the average of the five people you spend the most time with. Turns out that’s true. A large and growing body of behavioral science research shows that motivation (or lack thereof) is contagious.
  5. Take Small, Consistent Steps to Achieve Big Gains: “Habits build upon themselves. If you want to make any kind of significant change, you’d be wise to do so gradually and over time. .. Small and consistent victories compound over time, leading to massive gains.
  6. Be a Minimalist to Be a Maximalist: “You can’t be great at everything. Regularly reflect on what matters most to you and focus your efforts there. In the words of Mayo Clinic researcher and human performance expert Michael Joyner: “You’ve got to be a minimalist to be a maximalist; if you want to be really good at, master, and thoroughly enjoy one thing, you’ve got to say no to many others.”
  7. Make the Hard Thing Easier: “Willpower is overrated. Rather than relying completely on self-control, intentionally design your environment to make the hard thing easier. .. Don’t just think about how you’re going to accomplish your goals; think about how you’re going to design for them.
  8. Remember to Experience Joy: “Who doesn’t want to experience joy? But many Type A people are so driven to keep growing and progressing that sometimes they forget to be fully present for special moments or neglect to pause and celebrate their milestones. .. When things aren’t going well, we can fall back on happy memories to give us the resilience to move forward.

Source: Brad Stulberg on Pocket.com

I liked the following quote from Michel Joyner of Mayo Clinic.

“You’ve got to be a minimalist to be a maximalist; if you want to be really good at, master, and thoroughly enjoy one thing, you’ve got to say no to many others.”

– Michael Joyner, Mayo Clinic researcher and human performance (source: The New York Times)

I could attest to some of these principles, a few of them, I am also practicing, for example daily writing and activity habits, which I started small but consistently followed every single for a long time. Now it almost became a daily routine.