Vaccines 2.0 -Next Generation Vaccines


Day 431: Stay Safe Minnesota

Protecting the health of the global population will need a new generation of vaccines that are effective, affordable and accessible to everyone who needs them – even in the midst of a disease outbreak.

The British Society of Immunology (BSI) writes about next generation of vaccines “Protecting the health of the global population will need a new generation of vaccines that are effective, affordable and accessible to everyone who needs them – even in the midst of a disease outbreak. Vaccine research has come a long way since Edward Jenner and his cows, but there are still many challenges to be overcome.”

There is hope for universal flu and broadspectrum bacterial vaccines that work against current and future strains of these fast-evolving microbes.

British Journal of Immunology

The journal writes that one of the next vaccines that is entering to the market soon is “for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) – a development that could save the lives of tens of thousands children in the poorest parts of the world”.

In the journal Nature, Debby van Riel and Emmie de Witt write that the next generation of vaccines would be based solely on sequence information alone. “If the viral protein(s) important to provide protection from infection or disease, and thus for inclusion in a vaccine (that is, the vaccine antigen), is known the availability of coding sequences for this viral protein(s) suffices to start vaccine development, rather than having to depend on the ability to culture the virus. This makes these platforms highly adaptable and speeds up vaccine development considerably, as is clear from the fact that the majority of COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials currently ongoing involve a next-generation platform.”

In the USA Today, Karen WeIntraub writes that COVID-19 vaccines are among the best created and that pharmaceutical companies are trying to replicate its success to create next generation of vaccines.

The COVID-19 vaccines are among the best ever created. They’re safe and more than 90% effective at preventing any disease – even more so at blocking serious illness and death.

Karen WeIntraub, in USA Today

Scot Roberts, chief scientific officer of Altimmune, a biotech company based in Gaithersburg, Maryland, that is involved in creating next generation “inhaled vaccinetold USA Today “There’s a long history within vaccinology of second-generation vaccines being multiply improved over first-generation vaccines. That’s just the way things go.”

John Grabenstein, a pharmacist and public health leader reportedly said “Depth and Breadth” is needed in next generation of vaccines. “He expects protection against different variants and respiratory diseases and, ideally, a decade or more between shots.”

In the article, WeIntraub reports that vaccines manufacturers are exploring various approaches being considered to create next generation of vaccines including producing in plants, nasal vaccines, needle-free vaccines and others.

Coronavirus-19 vaccination watch

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) COVID vaccination tracker page (as of June 2, 9 a.m.) 366,977,535 doses have been distributed and 296,912,892 doses administered. According MDH COVID-19 Response vaccine data (as of May 31) a total of 5,307,794 doses of Covid-19 (Pfizer & Moderna) vaccines have been administered in Minnesota. According to the MDH latest tally (as of June 2) the confirmed COVID-19 cases in Minnesota are 601,645 (out of 9,964,217 tested) with 7,427 deaths.